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Museum of Dufferin again hosting Holiday Treasures, a market place




By Constance Scrafield

So lovely the see the Holiday Treasures market place again this year at the Museum of Dufferin (MoD) running now and until December 15, with the museum open Tuesday through Sunday. 

This is an array of artisans and crafts people bringing their textiles, candles, oils, wine bottle stoppers, jewellery, toys, pottery, wooden platters and so many more things to enjoy finding gifts and souvenirs for this season of remembering others.

On the opening day, we took a stroll through the market, which is arranged throughout the ground floor of the museum. What fun it is. There is plenty of room to visit the displays. They are set out in clusters around the ground floor. A perfect offer for vendors, as the museum staff do all the set up and they also sell the wares without the artists needing to be there. 

Having said that, this is a juried show, considered by a panel of judges who are from various walks of life – business, art, marketing - who look for what appeals, as to quality, desirability, what will sell, even practicality in some cases. 

“These are judges from outside the community,” said Nanci Malek, Marketing and Events Coordinator of the MoD. “They judge the applications from many points of view.

“This Holiday Treasures market has been running for 17 years; we really like putting it on. It creates another reason to visit the museum, sometimes bringing people here for the first time and, for our regular visitors, it's another great event.”

Curator, Sarah Robinson sat with us for a few moments, during the opening, to talk about the Holiday Treasures.

Said she, “There are 55 vendors here, 21 are local. Just 51% are new to the event. This year, there were over 70 applicants. We accepted 55. Last year, we had 45 but those ten of the accepted vendors were so good that we couldn't say no.”

She continued to explain, “We don't set a number; we base it on what we want to show. This year, it demonstrates the quality of the people's work that applied. Some have been here many times; other are here for the first time. We do all the set up and we do all the selling – we know there is lots going on for them at this time of year.”

As it happened, Mona van Velden was there and joined our conversation. Readers may remember Ms. Van Velden for the story in the Citizen about her art of up-cycling, especially fur coats into teddy bears or other wearables. Her stock at the Museum includes a teddy, wraps and a charming vest from up cycled fur. She has there several pairs of mittens made from felted sweaters, little trees from nice bits of felt, other knitted items – and interesting bits and pieces.

“I always think about my inventory,” she told us. “How can I make this better. I love to use the fur for teddies but I make other things as well. I get commissions for specific use of the furs.”

On Saturday, December 14, the offer at the Museum as part of the community give-back at the Holiday Treasures is photo taking in return for food donations going to, as Ms. Robinson told us, “the Shepherd's Cupboard, as the Shelburne Food Bank is called.”

“I'm there with a camera,” Ms.Malek promised. “And we take family holiday photos in the museum. I have arranged three locations: with the Christmas trees and the empty car and at Temptations.”

There is also the heritage log house. “You can have your picture pretty well anywhere,” she assured us. “This is on from 2:00pm to 4:00pm.

Bringing a donation to the food bank is accepted all day.

“Sunday, Hollywood Christmas is coming at 2:00 p.m., to the Corbetton church [adjacent to the museum, on the property]. Awarding-winning songwriter, singer, Sohayla Smith,” Ms. Malek was very excited to say. “She's amazing; she such a community minded spirit. She runs Souphause at a church in Shelburne. There's dinner there on Tuesday nights. 

“She is showcasing musical dance and acting with a Hollywood twist. This is great for all ages. The tickets are $10 at the door.”

She said, “Come back to the Museum for cider and treats after the show.

“It's really put on by her Troupe-Adore. They do shows all over - every kind of festival. They're always doing community festivals – she's amazing!” 

Any reason to coming to the Museum of Dufferin is a good reason and these are perfect for this time of year. Meet people you know and those you don't – be charmed by the ambience and the sales and remember this is your museum. If you have not done so already, have a look upstairs at the Corning Ware Cßollection, the premier of its kind in Canada. 

Ms. Malek put it, “When you walk into that museum, you're going to feel and see things you never have before. The role of the museum is to educate.”

Post date: 2019-12-05 16:53:14
Post date GMT: 2019-12-05 21:53:14
Post modified date: 2019-12-12 15:44:34
Post modified date GMT: 2019-12-12 20:44:34
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